Skip to Main Content Skip to Footer Content
Overstock Sale - up to 60% Off - SHOP NOW
How-To Guide

How to Load a Snowmobile into a Truck

 Posted on: September 17th, 2019

How to Load a Snowmobile into a Truck
Polaris Snowmobile loaded in a truck

Whether getting ready to hit the trails, or finishing up after a ride, here are the important steps for loading your snowmobile into your pickup truck using a snowmobile ramp.

Think about what you will be hauling

Use an appropriate ramp for your snowmobile

Not all ramps are created equal. Snowmobile ramps have distinct side panels so that ski runners can slide up effortlessly. If you try to load a snowmobile with a ramp designed for other vehicles, your ski runners could catch on the rungs and lead to severe damage to your snowmobile, as well as personal injury. To soften the transition from ground to ramp, ramp extenders reduce the angle of the ramp and help the track catch. For snowmobiles with studded tracks, we recommend either using using a ramp designed for studded tracks, or installing ramp grips that will prevent any damage to the center rungs.

Attach your snowmobile ramp to your truck

Attach your snowmobile ramp to your truck

After you’ve set your ramp in place, use a ratchet strap or chain to secure it directly to your truck, ideally at the hitch, or any metal part – just avoid connecting it to plastic components, as those could snap or break. Always set the connection point directly behind the ramp to prevent any unwanted side-to-side movement during use.

Align your snowmobile with the ramp

Align your snowmobile with the ramp

Because most snowmobile ramps have separate sections for the track and skis, it’s crucial to line them up properly. Riding up on any angle is a recipe for disaster! You risk the snowmobile slipping and falling, which could result in a heavy, expensive and painful situation.

Ride your snowmobile up and into your pickup bed

Ride your snowmobile up and into your pickup bed

Be confident, try not to stop on the ramp, and don’t be afraid to give your snowmobile a bit of power to successfully summit the ramp. The rule of thumb is to always drive your snowmobile in front-first; this will prevent wind damage to the snowmobile windshield during transit.

Secure your snowmobile in place

Secure your snowmobile in place

Once your snowmobile is in your truck, break out those tie downs. In a lot of cases, the snowmobile will be longer than your pickup bed and you want to make sure it will stay put in transit. Use a tie down bar such as the SuperClamp to secure the front skis, and attach ratchet straps on the rear to keep it secure. Keep in mind that the suspension will bounce a bit while moving, so make sure that your hooks are tight enough that they won’t pop out. After you’ve double-checked all of your connections, you can remove your ramp and be confident that your snowmobile isn’t going anywhere.